Gharana tradition : Gwalior

The Gharana tradition of India has fascinated music connoisseurs across the globe. In India a lot of importance is given to family heritage, be it wealth, profession or be it any form of art. The Gharana style of classical music being passed down through generations shows how much people of the subcontinent respect the presence of music in their lives. Although this style of classical music was more widespread earlier, it began to fade away as musicians began to travel, spreading their talents. During their widespread traveling they would give performances and also attend other concerts. They came across musicians from other musical Gharanas. And so instead of adhering to what they had been taught they began to imbibe other styles. Today, Gharana style of music has more or less faded away into oblivion with only a few musicians adhering to where they originally belong.

Gwalior Gharana is the oldest among all the Khayal Gayaki style Gharanas. The founder of this Gharana was Nathan Pir Bakhsh of Lucknow. During late 18th century he moved to the Gwalior court of Maharaja Jankoji Rao Scindia to escape the professional rivalry with another musician that had taken an ugly turn. The distinctive feature of this style of singing has been known for its lucidity and simplicity. Without going into further technicalities of this Gharana tradition, let us listen to some of its well known exponents.

Krishnarao Shankar Pandit – Tappa Kafi – O Miya Janewale :  Download

Vasundhara Komkali – Mishra Mand – Mriganayani :  Download

Madhup Mudgal – Alahiya Bilawal – Kavan Batariya :  Download

Meeta Pandit – Gaud Malhar – Umad Ghumad Aayo :  Download

Some of the more famous musicians belonging to Gwalior Gharana include D V Paluskar, Omkarnath Thakur, Kumar Gandharva, Malini Rajurkar, Amjad Ali Khan, Veena Sahasrabuddhe and many more. The list is long and one can go on and on. And of course the vocalists, and songs posted above, belong to the Gwalior Gharana.

.. more songs of other Gharanas coming soon.

indianraga

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